Energy Efficiency in San Gabriel Valley

About This Report

The San Gabriel Valley is home to 31 unique and exciting cities, each with its own energy use and greenhouse gas emissions profile. This report contains 2010 per capita activity data and overall greenhouse gas emissions data from all 27 cities that participated in the San Gabriel Valley Council of Governments Energy Action Plan project. The map above and charts below report how much electricity and natural gas people used, how far they drove, how much waste they generated, and the greenhouse gas emissions that occurred as a result of those activities.

Data sources and technical term definitions are included in the glossary, below. Detailed explanations of GHG emissions, energy use, methods, and assumptions are included in each of the energy action plans, linked below.

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Compare & Contrast

Explore the relationship between population and energy usage.

City by City

Click around to arrange the list by various metrics. Lower rank means lower emissions or use.

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Home to a number of historic residential neighborhoods, Alhambra is also a thriving commercial center in Los Angeles County with a diverse population.

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The largely residential community of Arcadia is supported primarily by tourism and entertainment, and is home to the famous Santa Anita Park racetrack.

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The diverse city of Baldwin Park was home to the first drive-through restaurant in California and ranks among the lowest per-household energy use in the San Gabriel Valley.

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The affluent, residential community of Bradbury has great potential to reduce energy use at its large estates, many of which are used for agricultural and equestrian purposes.

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Home to a number of higher education institutions and with a long tradition of tree planting, Claremont is sometimes called "The City of Trees and PhDs".

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Covina, once the world’s third-largest orange producer, is a medium-sized community with a traditional downtown and a diverse economy.

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A mostly residential community with significant growth potential, Diamond Bar takes its name from a 1918 ranch that once operated on the site.

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Home to the City of Hope Medical Center, Duarte’s dedication to environmental responsibility is cemented in the city’s 2,300 acres of open space and ambitious energy efficiency goals.

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The family-oriented city of El Monte boasts a rich history and a forward-looking strategy to reduce energy use in the community.

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Incorporated over 100 years ago, Glendora is home to a wide range of residential neighborhoods and a large amount of open space.

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Rock quarries dominate the small community of Irwindale, but the city is planning to attract more diverse land uses as some of the mines begin to close.

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Affluent and primarily residential, the community of La Cañada Flintridge is also home to NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory and 930 acres of open space.

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Once a major citrus, avocado, and walnut-producing area, and named for a bridge that once spanned San Jose Creek, La Puente today is a largely residential community.

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The city of La Verne is a low-density residential community with a diverse population and a small-town atmosphere.

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The community of Monrovia is one of the oldest in Los Angeles County, boasting a rich architectural heritage, a diverse economy, and a commitment to environmental responsibility.

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Italian for "beautiful mountain," Montebello once produced more than 12% of all the oil in California, but is now nationally recognized for its urban forest.

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Since its incorporation in 1916, Monterey Park has grown into a medium-sized and largely residential community with a large number of Asian-American residents.

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Pomona is the largest city participating in the EAP process and is a major city with a broad economy and a number of higher education institutes.

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Home to the headquarters of Edison International and a number of other well-known companies, Rosemead has a diverse economic base to match its diverse population.

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With a large number of historic buildings and a proud western heritage, San Dimas also features almost 3,800 acres of open space and a diverse economic base.

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San Gabriel was the first township in Los Angeles County and now looks to the future with the San Gabriel Goes Green strategy to promote sustainability in the community.

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This affluent, residential community is home to a number of historic buildings, including the renowned Huntington Library, and boasts some of the best public schools in the country.

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Sierra Madre retains its distinct small-town charm despite being only 17 miles from downtown Los Angeles, and is home to the largest flowering plant in the world.

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South El Monte today has a thriving, diverse economy, a largely Latino population, and one of the lowest per-household energy use figures in the San Gabriel Valley.

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The extensive urban forest and historic architecture of South Pasadena make this diverse community a popular filming location for movies and TV shows.

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Known as the “Home of the Camellias” and featuring a rapidly growing Asian-American population, this largely residential city is moving forward with an aggressive Energy Action Plan.

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The first community to achieve Platinum Level status in Southern California Edison’s Energy Leader Partnership, West Covina is both an economic and sustainability center in Los Angeles County.

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Glossary

Explanations for the various energy use categories and links to primary sources.

Community Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Inventory
PMC Analysis
A community inventory is a comprehensive account of the greenhouse gas emissions occurring within the city limits and as a result of activities within city limits during a given baseline year. An inventory accounts for greenhouse gases caused by energy (natural gas and electricity) use, transportation, waste, water, wastewater, and off-road equipment (construction and lawn equipment). Although cities participating in this project have different baseline years, 2010 inventories were conducted for every city to allow for comparison.
Residential Electricity
Southern California Edison (SCE)
Reports kilowatt hours (kWh) of electricity consumed by residential accounts in 2010.
Nonresidential Electricity
Southern California Edison (SCE)
Reports 2010 kilowatt hours (kWh) of electricity consumed by nonresidential accounts in 2010. This category includes commercial, industrial, and municipal accounts.
Street and Traffic Lighting Electricity
Southern California Edison (SCE)
Reports kilowatt hours (kWh) consumed by street and traffic lighting accounts in 2010. This sub-category of electricity use is often included in the “nonresidential” category, but has been separated here to allow for electricity per job analysis.
Residential Gas
Southern California Edison (SCE)
Reports therms of natural gas consumed by residential accounts in 2010.
NonResidential Gas
Southern California Edison (SCE)
Reports therms of natural gas consumed by nonresidential accounts in 2010.
Annual Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT)
Fehr & Peers (transportation consultants)
Reports estimated total miles traveled by on-road vehicles to, from, and within the city in 2010.
Waste
CalRecycle
Reports the combination municipal solid waste (trash), alternative daily cover (green waste such as yard clippings and compost), and transformed waste (waste sent to regional incinerators from the city) (in tons) in 2010. Waste is included in the inventory because as it decomposes, it releases methane, a greenhouse gas.
2010 Households
Table DP-1, 2010 Census
Reports occupied households in 2010.
2010 Population
Table DP-1, 2010 Census
Reports total population in 2010.
2010 Jobs
2012 Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) Regional Transportation Plan (RTP)
Reports jobs in 2010.
2010 Service Population
Calculated by PMC
Reports the sum of jobs and residents in a city in 2010. Service population is sometimes used instead of population or job counts alone, because it provides a better understanding of how many people are in a city during any given day.


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